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Working in Hollywood

by Ronny Regev The University of North Carolina Press (September 25, 2018)

A history of the Hollywood film industry as a modern system of labor, this book reveals an important untold story of an influential twentieth-century workplace. Ronny Regev argues that the Hollywood studio system...


Labor’s Great War

by Joseph A. McCartin The University of North Carolina Press (November 01, 2017)

Since World War I, says Joseph McCartin, the central problem of American labor relations has been the struggle among workers, managers, and state officials to reconcile democracy and authority in the workplace....


Immigrant City

by Donald B. Cole The University of North Carolina Press (October 10, 2017)

The violence and radicalism connected with the Industrial Workers of the World textile strike of 1912 in Lawrence, Massachusetts, left the popular impression that Lawrence was a slum-ridden city inhabited by...


Black Firefighters and the FDNY

by David Goldberg The University of North Carolina Press (October 23, 2017)

For many African Americans, getting a public sector job has historically been one of the few paths to the financial stability of the middle class, and in New York City, few such jobs were as sought-after as...


From South Texas to the Nation

by John Weber The University of North Carolina Press (August 25, 2015)

In the early years of the twentieth century, newcomer farmers and migrant Mexicans forged a new world in South Texas. In just a decade, this vast region, previously considered too isolated and desolate for large-scale...


Living the Revolution

by Jennifer Guglielmo The University of North Carolina Press (May 03, 2010)

Italians were the largest group of immigrants to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, and hundreds of thousands led and participated in some of the period's most volatile labor strikes. Jennifer...


Unprotected Labor

by Vanessa H. May The University of North Carolina Press (June 01, 2011)

Through an analysis of women's reform, domestic worker activism, and cultural values attached to public and private space, Vanessa May explains how and why domestic workers, the largest category of working women...


Commonsense Anticommunism

by Jennifer Luff The University of North Carolina Press (May 21, 2012)

Between the Great War and Pearl Harbor, conservative labor leaders declared themselves America's "first line of defense" against Communism. In this surprising account, Jennifer Luff shows how the American Federation...


Racism in the Nation's Service

by Eric S. Yellin The University of North Carolina Press (April 22, 2013)

Between the 1880s and 1910s, thousands of African Americans passed civil service exams and became employed in the executive offices of the federal government. However, by 1920, promotions to well-paying federal...


The Farmer's Benevolent Trust

by Victoria Saker Woeste The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Americans have always regarded farming as a special calling, one

imbued with the Jeffersonian values of individualism and self-

sufficiency. As Victoria Saker Woeste demonstrates, farming's

cultural image continued...


Civilizing Capitalism

by Landon R. Y. Storrs The University of North Carolina Press (July 11, 2003)

Offering fresh insights into the history of labor policy, the New Deal, feminism, and southern politics, Landon Storrs examines the New Deal era of the National Consumers' League, one of the most influential...


A Fabric of Defeat

by Bryant Simon The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

In this book, Bryant Simon brings to life the politics of white South Carolina millhands during the first half of the twentieth century. His revealing and moving account explores how this group of southern laborers...


Hazards of the Job

by Christopher C. Sellers The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

Hazards of the Job explores the roots of modern environmentalism in the early-twentieth-century United States. It was in the workplace of this era, argues Christopher Sellers, that our contemporary understanding...


Gastonia 1929

by John A. Salmond The University of North Carolina Press (November 20, 1995)

Of the wave of labor strikes that swept through the South in 1929, the one at the Loray Mill in Gastonia, North Carolina, is perhaps the best remembered. In Gastonia 1929 John Salmond provides the first detailed...


There's Always Work at the Post Office

by Philip F. Rubio The University of North Carolina Press (May 15, 2010)

This book brings to life the important but neglected story of African American postal workers and the critical role they played in the U.S. labor and black freedom movements. Historian Philip Rubio, a former...


The Deepest Wounds

by Thomas D. Rogers The University of North Carolina Press (November 01, 2010)

In The Deepest Wounds, Thomas D. Rogers traces social and environmental changes over four centuries in Pernambuco, Brazil's key northeastern sugar-growing state. Focusing particularly on the period from the...


The Tejano Diaspora

by Marc Simon Rodriguez The University of North Carolina Press (April 18, 2011)

Each spring during the 1960s and 1970s, a quarter million farm workers left Texas to travel across the nation, from the Midwest to California, to harvest America's agricultural products. During this migration...


Smeltertown

by Monica Perales The University of North Carolina Press (September 13, 2010)

Company town. Blighted community. Beloved home. Nestled on the banks of the Rio Grande, at the heart of a railroad, mining, and smelting empire, Smeltertown--La Esmelda, as its residents called it--was home...


To Be a Worker

by Jorge Parodi The University of North Carolina Press (June 19, 2003)

A contemporary classic in Peru, where it was first published in 1986, this book explores changes in the political identity and economic strategies of the Peruvian working class in the 1970s and 1980s. Jorge...


Colin Palmer’s Trilogy on Imperialism in the Caribbean, Omnibus E-Book

by Colin A. Palmer The University of North Carolina Press (March 01, 2014)

This Omnibus E-Book brings together all three of Colin A. Palmer's books on the making of the modern Caribbean. Included are:

Freedom's Children: The 1938 Labor Rebellion and the Birth of Modern Jamaica

This is...


Freedom's Children

by Colin A. Palmer The University of North Carolina Press (February 03, 2014)

Freedom's Children is the first comprehensive history of Jamaica's watershed 1938 labor rebellion and its aftermath. Colin Palmer argues that, a hundred years after the abolition of slavery, Jamaica's disgruntled...


Strikebreaking and Intimidation

by Stephen H. Norwood The University of North Carolina Press (April 03, 2003)

This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. Paradoxically,...


The Color of Work

by Timothy J. Minchin The University of North Carolina Press (January 14, 2003)

Histories of the civil rights movement have generally overlooked the battle to integrate the South's major industries. The paper industry, which has played an important role in the southern economy since the...


What Do We Need a Union For?

by Timothy J. Minchin The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

The rise in standards of living throughout the U. S. in the wake of World War II brought significant changes to the lives of southern textile workers. Mill workers' wages rose, their purchasing power grew, and...


Sweatshops at Sea

by Leon Fink The University of North Carolina Press (March 14, 2011)

As the main artery of international commerce, merchant shipping was the world's first globalized industry, often serving as a vanguard for issues touching on labor recruiting, the employment relationship, and...


Braceros

by Déborah Cohen The University of North Carolina Press (February 15, 2011)

At the beginning of World War II, the United States and Mexico launched the bracero program, a series of labor agreements that brought Mexican men to work temporarily in U.S. agricultural fields. In Braceros...


We Were All Like Migrant Workers Here

by William J. Bauer Jr. The University of North Carolina Press (December 15, 2009)

The federally recognized Round Valley Indian Tribes are a small, confederated people whose members today come from twelve indigenous California tribes. In 1849, during the California gold rush, people from several...


The CIO, 1935-1955

by Robert H. Zieger The University of North Carolina Press (November 09, 2000)

The Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) encompassed the largest sustained surge of worker organization in American history. Robert Zieger charts the rise of this industrial union movement, from the founding...


Seasons of Change

by Chantal Norrgard The University of North Carolina Press (August 15, 2014)

From the 1870s to the 1930s, the Lake Superior Ojibwes of Minnesota and Wisconsin faced dramatic economic, political, and social changes. Examining a period that began with the tribe's removal to reservations...